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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
things in the environment and i will pound mail that goes to official facilities like capitol hill or white house. this person must have known that this mail could be intercepted but that doesn't absolve of the clumsy murder attempt. he did everything but put his address and fingerprints on envelope. the real risk is not necessarily organized plot or someone trying to perpetrate a terrorist the act but a lone mad scientist with diabolical intent with a apocalyptic vision who has the means to reengineer a virus or a bug. jenna: when we get that scenario, it brings us to the movies. what is the worst case scenario? when people ask you that what do you think is the case scenario when it comes to this substance? >> worst-case scenario, someone who is smart and ph.d scientist and knows how to work on genetic materials like the movie 12 monkeys. jenna: we're into speculation but not necessarily ricin or anthrax or something we know of? >> ricin is not a very potent killer. it is used in the past for targeted as nations but none on the list of 12 compounds the government says is major thr
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
on the environment and wildlife. let's look at where the ban applies. these include grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurants food takeouts or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods d prescription meds. we want to make note, if you don't have that reusable bag handy starting today here in those san mateo county cities, you will have to pay 10 cents for a paper bag and that fee is going up in 2015. it will go up to 25 cents per paper bag. so it's a good investment to make right now. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> by the end of the year, at least 17 cities in san mateo county will have implemented that plastic bag ban. >>> new this morning, it turns out a new waterfront development deal in oakland requires a substantial down payment from taxpayers. our own phil matier reports that to help swing the deal with chinese backing, oakland has agreed to spend about $25 million in unused redevelopment money. that money would be used to buy two parcels of land from the signature development group. >>> later today oakland sch
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
is that they see the light. the leaves of the iris are constantly monitoring light environment. they're actually may sewering how long the night is. >> reporter: it has nothing to do with summer. it is all about recognizing... >> the length of the day and the length of the night. >> reporter: this blooming iris was captured in time lapse video by film maker lewis swarsberg. the images show case the wonder of these plants. which can detect and respond to light even color. >> just like we can see red, blue and green, plants can see red, blue and even u.v. light. >> reporter: in some ways plants have a greater spectrum of light. >> they see more than we do. from a plant's point of view we're visually challenged. we only have four or five photo receptors, proteins that can see the light in our bodies. plants have like 13. >> they don't have sense organs in the way that we do. they don't have eyes or ears or noses, but they have receptors. and that's the level at which humans and plants are the same. >> reporter: amy litt is the director of plant-gemomics at the botanical garden. she explains that so
this is not an environment in which to address this. there are serious allegations of what they knew and did not know, and we'll have the benefit of hindsight. we are all monday morning quarterbacks on this, but because of his and issue intricately woven into legislation, we ought to let the dust settle, the emotions calm down before we address it. ashley: when you look at the root they took, everything was done legally. they went through the process, the younger brother became a citizen on 9/11 last year, the older brother held a green card, they filled out all the forms. what did the fbi now reportedly, allegedly i should say, knew they were tipped off the older brother, there was concerned about him. from an immigration point of view, some say they got through the cracks. tracy: fbi does not monitor immigrants. the fbi would only get involved with immigrant if there is credible allegation of criminal activity. it did not rise to the level of prosecution of credibility. they can only go forward with and do something with evidence when there is enough evidence to move forward with it did not exist at the ti
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
them into an environment that is hostile to gays and lesbians -- >> stephanie: yeah. that's true. you are teaching them, like it's okay if this is a phase and then just work your way out of it by the time you were 18. >> yeah, and if you don't then we don't want you. but while you are here maybe let's do some back door repair with therapy. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: we have people who are totally anti-gay with their arms wrapped around people who need to see the light and be morally straight. >> yeah. ann romney will show up saying stop it. >> ann romney: stop it. this is hard. you want to try it get in the ring. stop it. >> stephanie: are you pitching a tent. top it. merny you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, stephanie. hang on just a minute -- i got to -- >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: i just wanted to remind everybody that pedophilia is not about the sex, it's a form of rape basically -- it's about domination power, control, the whole bit, and i think these people are just a little bit afraid to seay adults, heaven forbid h
of positions. when we're in an environment where we've got 7.7% unemployment in this country, if you can get a job, take it. >> steve: if people want more information about the jobs we talked to -- >> casoneexchange.com. i went through a lot of cities. i have a lot of web sites where you can go and apply to every single company i went through today. we're going to talk about jobs on the business network because we do that every day. we need jobs to get the economy going. >> steve: thanks for giving us the business today. >> that's what i do. every tuesday. >> steve: it is. thanks. meanwhile, a gun store offering a rifle give aways on facebook. its page mysteriously shut down. sounds like facebook is getting political, doesn't it? we'll talk about that. mike jarrett, see the interview that made them lose it on tv next hour. >> he is good looking. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promise
easily to $2 billion in savings. $4.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower acroscost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue,-costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and pre funding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make u
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)